Tag: Kidney

How Dietitians Can Help In Kidney Disease-Looking at the Research

write about kidney disease and bone health

We came across this topic some time back and thought it would be good inspiration for a NutriScape.NET article written from the dietitian’s point of view. Here are some quick snippets you can follow.


Review this Study and Write an article that shows our value!

Dietary Interventions with Dietitians for Adults with Kidney Disease


Your writing adds immense value to The NutriScape Project’s educational mission and places our writers as experts in the field. It can deliver you attention from your perfect clients so that they can connect—that’s what it’s all about. But first, let’s make sure this article is going to get the attention it deserves.

When Google Likes Your Article, Clients Find You

We want to make it easy to write great articles that get awesome levels of traffic.  That requires SEO.  SEO is the art and science of getting found on Google. It is a highly technical topic that most dietitians prefer not to tackle. And SEO is best done before any writing even takes place. 

Our specialist dietitian has already done much of the SEO work for you–researching and testing out the best keywords and heading structure to include to make your article show up in internet searches.

Keywords:

Coming up with the best keywords is tricky. Many of the keywords we would normally think of having either too much competition or too little search traffic. You will want to use the keyword/keyphrase in the first paragraph of your article and several more times.

According to our research, these are the best keyword(s) or keyphrase(s) to include in your article:

  • importance of a ietitian for nutritional management of a renal patient
  • interventions of a dietitian for renal patients
  • dietitian’s role in renal patients

Suggested Headings

Readers love easy reading! Google looks for readability and scanability, so headings are important. Headings make your article easy to scan and can also break up long blocks of text that tend to overwhelm your readers.

During the keyword research process, these heading ideas came up in the top-rated articles and searches. If these headings fit the topic you are writing about and the article you want to write, they would probably help the article rank well in Google searches. They are only suggestions, so if they don’t fit what you are writing, you will want to create something better. Here are the headings our SEO dietitian suggested for this article:

  • Chronic Kidney Disease & Nutrition for Dietetic Educators
  • Dietitians at the Dialysis Center
  • How an RDN Can Help with Kidney Disease
  • What do renal dietitians do?

Planning And Writing Your Article

This resource is sure to help as you organize your thoughts:


Choosing the Right Breakfast Cereal with CKD

Your writing adds immense value to The NutriScape Project’s educational mission and places our writers as experts in the field. It can deliver you attention from your perfect clients so that they can connect—that’s what it’s all about. But first, let’s make sure this article is going to get the attention it deserves.

When Google Likes Your Article, Clients Find You

We want to make it easy to write great articles that get awesome levels of traffic.  That requires SEO.  SEO is the art and science of getting found on Google. It is a highly technical topic that most dietitians prefer not to tackle. And SEO is best done before any writing even takes place. 

Our specialist dietitian has already done much of the SEO work for you–researching and testing out the best keywords and heading structure to include to make your article show up in internet searches.

Keywords:

Coming up with the best keywords is tricky. We would normally think of many of the keywords having either too much competition or too little search traffic. You will want to use the keyword/keyphrase in the first paragraph of your article and several more times.

According to our research, these are the best keyword(s) or keyphrase(s) to include in your article:

  • chronic kidney disease
  • diet for chronic kidney disease
  • What is the best cereal for kidney disease

Suggested Headings

Readers love easy reading! Google looks for readability and scanability, so headings are important. Headings make your article easy to scan and can also break up long blocks of text that tend to overwhelm your readers.

During the keyword research process, these heading ideas came up in the top-rated articles and searches. If these headings fit the topic you are writing about and the article you want to write, they would probably help the article rank well in Google searches. They are only suggestions, so if they don’t fit what you are writing, you will want to create something better. Here are the headings our SEO dietitian suggested for this article:

  • How to Pick the Best Cereal for Kidney Disease
  • Choosing the Right Cereal – Kidney Diet Tips
  • The Best Cereals That Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Should Choose To Eat
  • Top 10 Low Potassium Cereals



Predictive Capabilities of Urine Metabolites on Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease in T2D

write about kidney health

Investigators examine whether urine metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid cycle can independently predict the risk for CKD progression in individuals with type 2 diabetes.”

Source: Predictive Capabilities of Urine Metabolites on Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease in T2D


Planning And Writing Your Article

This resource is sure to help as you organize your thoughts:



Nutritional status, cardiovascular comorbidities linked to increased mortality risk in older hemodialysis patients

In older hemodialysis patients, nutritional status and cardiovascular comorbidities appeared to be associated with mortality, and may serve as prognostic factors for poor survival, according to findings published in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. “The prognostic impact of several complications of chronic kidney disease, such as protein-energy wasting, anemia, hypertension, and mineral

Source: Nutritional status, cardiovascular comorbidities linked to increased mortality risk in older hemodialysis patients




New app for veterans and other patients with kidney disease targets nutritione

Kidney care associations are working with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to recruit patients for testing a new nutrition mobile app for veterans and other individuals managing kidney disease. According to a press release, the MyKidneyNutrition app will allow patients to track daily activities including nutrition, fitness and medication information. The American Association of Kidney

Source: New app for veterans and other patients with kidney disease targets nutrition






DASH Diet for Oxalate Kidney Stones


Re: bypass with kidney stones and multiple allergies
Fri Nov 17, 2017 2:26 am (PST) . Posted by: “Jason Holden”
I believe excessive protein intake can increase urinary calcium excretion,
thus theoretically increasing the risk of calcium stone formation. Some
interventions I like to use for reducing the risk of stone formation are
lots of fluids, increase fruit, vegetables, moderately low oxalate legumes,
low-fat dairy (there was one trial showing DASH style diet reduced calcium
oxalate supersaturation better than a low oxalate diet), reduce sodium
intake if excessive, reduce protein intake if excessive, take calcium
citrate with meals (especially meals high in oxalate), incorporate
probiotic foods, swap high oxalate foods with similarly healthy lower
oxalate foods. Make sure total calcium intake at least meets current ASMBS
guidelines, but is not above the UL.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24560157
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26150027

> I would recommend making sure the pt is getting enough calcium because
> inadequate amounts can actual lead to more stone formation. Given that the
> patient is ​post-RNY, they may be having issue with absorption- kidney
> stones for that reason is something we see somewhat frequently here in our
> lost to follow-up patients.

Am J Kidney Dis. 2014 Mar;63(3):456-63. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2013.11.022. Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov’t

Source: Urinary lithogenic risk profile in recurrent stone formers with hyperoxaluria: a randomized controlled trial comparing DASH (Dietary Approaches to … – PubMed – NCBI