Tag: Cost

Eating Well on a Budget

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We came across this topic some time back and thought it would be good inspiration for a NutriScape.NET article written from the dietitian’s point of view. Here are some quick snippets you can follow.


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  1. Cook at home. Restaurant food, whether it’s from a fast-food or high-end restaurant, is going to be more expensive than a healthy meal you make yourself. If cooking is really new to you, start slowly to build your skills, try cooking one meal a week. Once you have got a few recipes you feel confident with, increase the number of home-cooked meals per week.
  2. Explore meal delivery kits if you’re a newbie cook, or if you simply want to make it easier for yourself.  These kits can be more expensive than buying the produce yourself, but it can save you time and can come with recipe cards. Look for one with minimal packaging to reduce your environmental footprint.
  3. Always have staples in your pantry. Buying staples such as rice and beans in bulk is cheaper and then you can always have them on hand.
  4. Make extra portions every time you cook at home, to eat as leftovers the next day, for lunch, or to freeze for future meals.
  5. Buy fresh produce in season and look for specials. Consider local farmers’ markets.
  6. Spend a few minutes each week planning meals and making a grocery list. This can make you feel more in control and hopefully reduces impulse buying.
  7. Shopping and cooking with a friend or relative could help share expenses, provide support and skills, and exchange knowledge. It’s also a great way to spend time with your children. The more time they spend with you in the kitchen, the more they’ll learn about real food and how to cook it.
  8. Never go food shopping when you’re hungry.
  9. Wholefoods are usually in the outer aisles of the supermarket. It’s tempting to get sucked into the centre aisles and be lulled into buying the latest specials (likely ultra-processed foods), but for the most part, you’ll probably regret it!
  10. Beware of supermarket tricks to entice you into buying more expensive food items. For example, more expensive products tend to be shelved at eye level, and cheaper items are placed either on the upper or lower shelves.
  11. Many communities now have communal vegetable gardens. You might also find community kitchens, soup kitchens, or produce delivery options.

  1. Focus on real, whole food and avoid anything that is ultra-processed food. 
  2. Remain open to slightly processed items, such as canned beans and frozen veggies. If these make it easier for you to cook at home, go for it! They are still very nutritious.
  3. Buy produce that is in season. Fresh produce is more nutritious than produce that has been stored for weeks. Seasonal produce is often much cheaper, saving you money.
  4. Every time you go shopping look for a new fruit or vegetable to try. Such as bok choy, kale or black beans. Go online and read about it, and see how you might use it in some recipes for the next week.
  5. Dark, leafy greens are a great source of some of those B vitamins you need for resilience, though B12 is best obtained from animal protein.
  6. Meat, fish, and eggs are good sources of protein, helping to regulate blood sugar and appetite as well as providing bioavailable iron and zinc.
  7. Search for local farmers markets – you can also talk about where and how the produce was grown with the farmer.

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How reversing diabetes cost to drive savings impact is viable


We came across this topic some time back and thought it would be good inspiration for a NutriScape.NET article written from the dietitian’s point of view. Here are some quick snippets you can follow.


The healthcare system could save $10 billion annually if Type 2 sufferers used dietary changes to reduce HbA1c levels by 1 percent.

Source: How reversing diabetes cost to drive savings impact is viable


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How reversing diabetes cost to drive savings impact is viable


We came across this topic some time back and thought it would be good inspiration for a NutriScape.NET article written from the dietitian’s point of view. Here are some quick snippets you can follow.


The healthcare system could save $10 billion annually if Type 2 sufferers used dietary changes to reduce HbA1c levels by 1 percent.

Source: How reversing diabetes cost to drive savings impact is viable


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Four strategies to obtain affordable insulin

CHICAGO — As the cost for insulin continues to rise, clinicians can take several proactive steps to help uninsured and underinsured patients afford their medications today, according to a speaker at the Cardiometabolic Health Congress. Insulin prices, which tripled from 2002 to 2013, continue to climb, nearly doubling between 2012 and 2016, according to 2017 data from the Health Care Cost

Healio Article: Four strategies to obtain affordable insulin




Clinical and cost benefits of medical nutrition therapy by registered dietitian nutritionists for management of dyslipidemia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Faced with increasing health care costs, it is incumbent to discern whether managing dyslipidemia with medical nutrition therapy (MNT) by a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) is clinically and cost effective.”

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Cost Calculation and Adherence to ADA Recommendations Based on a Flash Continuous Glucose Monitoring System for People with T1DM or T2DM Using MDI Therapy

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Background: A novel, factory-calibrated, flash continuous glucose monitoring system (flash CGM; FreeStyle Libre™ system) was approved by FDA in September 2017. The clinical benefit of flash CGM as a replacement for routine self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for people using MDI therapy has been assessed in RCTs in T1DM (Bolinder, 2016) and T2DM (Haak,2017). In both 6-month studies, people using flash CGM achieved a substantial reduction in hypoglycemia compared with those using SMBG, without increasing HbA1c or reducing the dose of insulin.”

Source: Cost Calculation and Adherence to ADA Recommendations Based on a Flash Continuous Glucose Monitoring System for People with T1DM or T2DM Using MDI Therapy















A Budgetary Impact Analysis of Medicare Coverage for AntiObesity Interventions

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Key Findings
 IHS Markit used a validated and published individual simulation model to predict the budget
impact to Medicare coverage utilization of anti-obesity interventions
 Over the next 10 years, Medicare is expected to save $19 billion after a modest coverage
utilization, and $21 billion after a more aggressive coverage utilization, with the majority of the
savings coming from reduction in ambulatory care (Part B) and prescription drug (Part D)
expenditures
 Even after an aggressive (67.4%) coverage utilization, the evidence shows ≤8% of all Medicare
beneficiaries to receive some form of anti-obesity treatment
 The analysis demonstrates on average, lifestyle intervention helps elderly who are eligible lose
7.5% of excessive weight per year, and anti-obesity drug combined with lifestyle intervention can
help eligible patients lose about 9.7%. Participants regain 1/3 of initial lost weight within 5 years
after discontinuation
 The data show that each treated beneficiary is expected to incur direct costs to Medicare of
~$1,700 from covered anti-obesity treatment. Those costs will be offset by improvement in their
overall health condition, leading to lower expenditures in ER, ambulatory care, inpatient stays,
and Rx, resulting in net savings between $6,700 – $7,100 over 10 years per person
 Model estimates across the entire Medicare population suggest medical expense would increase
about $120 per beneficiary due to higher coverage utilization. The reduction in the cost of
treating obesity complications would be more than enough to offset the increased expense,
leading to a net savings of between $300 – $330 per beneficiary over 10 years

Source: Budget Report


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